Today’s food is packaged in so much plastic that humans now regularly consume plastic molecules in their food. A Polish design student created Scoby packaging, an edible and recyclable packaging that farmers can grow to wrap products. The zero waste biological tissue is a similar texture to animal tissue used to encapsulate sausage or salami, but Scoby is vegetarian and can be grown with a simple chemical process student Roza Janusz of the School of Form in Poznan, Poland invented. The process is similar to making kombucha, and the fermentation growth time per sheet is two weeks.

Read more (Fast Company)

Fermentation is dominating 2019 food prediction lists. The New York Times says fermented foods and fermented drinks will rule in 2019. The year’s flavor profile will be “Sour and funky, with shades of heat,” melding fermented ingredients with millennial taste buds. Probiotics and prebiotics will continue to reign as consumers focus on gut health. “As the obsession with digestive health dovetails with the fascination for fermenting, kimchi, sauerkraut and pickled things will work their way into new territory. Smoothies with kefir will be popular, and kombucha will show up in unexpected places like salad dressings,” the article continues. What will you be eating in 2019?

Read more (New York Times)

The new “it” clean food label: Glyphosate Residue-Free Certification. The main ingredient in weed killer, glyphosate is the most heavily used pesticide in the world. A probable human carcinogen, Forbes estimates it’s about to become a household name consumers will cut out of their food. Though glyphosate is banned in organic crops, it still drifts into the organic food supply, especially in anything oat-based. The new label is awarded by 3rd-party The Detox Project, who regularly tests brands for glyphosates. Costing $1,472 per year, the certification was first granted to Foodstirs, the organic baking company launched by actress Sarah Michelle Gellar and Galit Laibow.

Read more (Forbes) (Photo by: Foodstirs)

Brew Dr. Kombucha became the first nationally distributed kombucha brand to receive a B Corporation certification. The prestigious ranking is given to companies that score high in social sustainability and environmental performance. Brew Dr. sources 100 percent renewable energy, implements a closed-loop brewing process and donates 1 percent of revenue to local environmental non-profits. Matt Thomas, founder and CEO of Brew Dr. Kombucha, said the B Corp certification “is one of the proudest moments I’ve experienced since founding Brew Dr. Kombucha.” He stressed that his company places “equal value on people, planet and profits.” More and more consumers want healthy products, but they also want their products to be created using both environmentally and ethically responsible efforts.

Read more (BevNet) (Photo: Brew Dr. Kombucha)

Peet’s Coffee is the second major coffee brand adding kombucha to their portfolio. The craft coffee company announced that it acquired major stake in Revive Kombucha. Revive grew 168% in the last year, and the latest financing will likely help Revive capture the national market. The kombucha will be sold in more than 15,000 of Peet’s grocery store locations. Eric Lauterbach, President of the Consumer Division at Peet’s Coffee, said kombucha is a natural fit since consumers tend to love both coffee and kombucha.

Read more (PR Newswire) (Photo: Revive Kombucha)

The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at http://ow.ly/dfN030mfgBY .

A kombucha entrepreneur made a major deal on the latest episode of “Shark Tank.” All the investor “sharks” wanted in on Kate Field’s at-home kombucha brewing kit. Two sharks offered Field $350,000 in exchange for 10 percent of her business, The Kombucha Shop. The kit sells for $45 and includes a reusable brew jar, a temperature gauge, test strips, brewing instructions and ingredients. (Inc.) (Photo from: The Kombucha Shop) https://goo.gl/4GjJhq .

Fermented dairy products reduce the risk of heart disease, according to a new study. By analyzing food journals a group of men kept over 11 years, scientists concluded fermented dairy products have great health benefits. Part of the reason this is important is because dairy products with a high-fat content have been villainized by health experts, causing the public to cut back full-fat milk products. However, the new study is now prompting researchers “to question whether dairy products should be evaluated solely on their fat content, but rather their nutritional content.”

Read more (Newsweek)

Mojo Kombucha — part of Australian-based Organic & Raw Trading Co. — was acquired by Coca-Cola. It’s exciting news for fermenters. Industry leaders are calling it a landmark deal, making kombucha more mainstream. Coca-Cola is the world’s largest drink company, and they’ve been diversifying their products to include healthier options for consumers.

Read more (Reuters) (Photo: Mojo Kombucha)

Where do fermentation and mixology meet? Fermentation guru Alex Lewin and author of “Kombucha, Kefir, and Beyond” is sharing his techniques at Culture Club 101 in Pasadena on Oct. 7. Alex will share the history of fermented drinks, their health benefits and demo fermented drink creations. Join us Oct. 7 act Culture Club 101 in Pasadena.

Read more (Culture Club)