Equality in Brewing

Though Black people make up 13% of the nation’s population, they comprise less than 1% of brewers. Amidst rising demands for racial equality, brewers across the nation are trying to change the industry. “It takes nothing to do a one-time act,” says Latiesha Cook, the chief executive of Beer Kulture @beerkulture, a new nonprofit group that brings people of color into the craft-beer world through charitable and educational efforts. “Your brewery is not going to be diverse and inclusive tomorrow, but the work you put in today is going to effect that change five years from now.”

Articles in both the New York Times and Inc. list brewers creating programs to bring more Black people into brewing.

– Brooklyn Brewery @brooklynbrewery (Brooklyn, New York) launches Michael James Jackson Foundation for Brewing & Distilling for brewing and distilling scholarships for Black, Indigenous and people of color.
– Crowns & Hops @crownsandhops (Inglewood, Calif.), a craft beer and lifestyle brand with the slogan “Black People Love Beer,” launch the 8 Trill Pils Fund to give grants to other Black brewers.
– Orpheus Brewing @orpheusbrewing (Atlanta) introduces its Leadership Diversity Program, a six-month paid internship.
– Fremont Brewing @fremontbrewing (Seattle), will offer six- to eight-week internship next year.
– Weathered Souls Brewing @weatheredsoulsbrewing_marcus (San Antonio, Texas), creates Black Is Beautiful project, where participating breweries create a beer with the Black Is Beautiful label and donate proceeds to organizations supporting equality and police reform.
– Finback Brewery @finbackbrewery (Queens and Brooklyn, New York) creates I.P.A. label Breathing: Conversations, with discussions about race printed on the beer’s label to foster dialogue among drinkers.
– Constellation Brands, which imports Corona and other beers, founds a Focus on Minority Founders Program. The company’s venture capital division also announces places to invest $100 million in Black- and minority-owned alcohol beverage businesses over the next decade.

Read more (New York Times & Inc.)

Craft Brewing Volume

Craft brewing volume has declined 10% in the first half of 2020 versus last year.

Brewers Association

A brewery in Sydney, Australia is getting creative with the carbon dioxide emissions produced by yeast during fermentation. Young Henrys, with the help of a local university, is feeding those fermentation gases into tanks of native river algae that turn that CO2 back into oxygen. This process neutralizes the emissions. The CO2 produced to make one six pack of beer would take a tree two days to absorb.

“You have this really amazing yin and yang scenario,” said Oscar McMahon, Young Henrys co-founder. “One tank of algae is capable of creating the equivalent amount of oxygen as one hectare of Australian bush. It takes a long time to grow that, whereas we can grow a tank of algae within weeks.”

Read more (Bloomberg)

Leaders of the wine industry are asking the community to rally and appeal tax hikes. As the industry continues reeling from losses related to COVID-19, a new round of potential tariff hikes threatens the industry. In 2020, a 25% tariff imposed on certain European wines and cheeses was described by some as the greatest threat to the wine and spirit industry since the prohibition era. U.S. President Donald Trump imposed the tariffs in retaliation for a tax imposed in France on several large American tech ferns, such as Facebook, Google and Airbus.

Read more (Vinepair)

Hops used to be the biggest thing in beer to create a powerful flavor — now it’s yeast strains. Brewers are using yeast strains from around the globe for the best flavor.

According to the New York Times: “For some time, it’s been a hopped-up arms race as breweries regularly double or triple the amount of hops to create stronger aromas. With breweries using the same hops, many beers are starting to smell alike. … In search of distinct aromas, brewers are embracing yeast and bacteria strains from across the globe. They’re creating beers that let each type of microbe speak its unique language, and drinkers are listening.”

DeWayne Schaaf, owner of @ebbandflowfermentations Ebb & Flow Fermentations brewery in Missouri, calls himself a “yeast nerd.” He does not use commercial yeasts in his drinks, instead fermenting with yeast strains from Scandinavian farms, bottles of Spanish natural wine and Colorado dandelions. Few hops are required in his drinks as, during fermentation, the yeast converts sugars into alcohol for the flavors.

Other fermenters featured in the article include: @omegayeast Omega Yeast (supplier of yeast strains in Chicago), Berg’n (a beer hall in New York), @alvaradostreetbrewery Alvarado Street Brewery (brewery in California), @yeastofeden Yeast of Eden (brew pub in California), @bootlegbiology Bootleg Biology (yeast lab in Tennessee), @whitelabsyeast White Labs (yeast supplier in North Carolina and California) and Lars Marius Garshol (Norwegian author of “Historical Brewing Techniques: The Lost Art of Farmhouse Brewing

Read more (New York Times)

Weathered Souls Brewing Co., a black-owned brewery in Texas, has launched the Black is Beautiful initiative to bring awareness to racial injustice and “show that the brewing community is an inclusive place for everyone of any color.” They are encouraging breweries to develop their own Black is Beautiful stout. Weathered Souls has shared a stout base recipe, and ask breweries to develop their own creative spin on the drink. A free label has been provided on their website, and the campaign encourages breweries to donate a portion of sales of the stout go to local foundations that support police reform and legal defenses.

Stout is a top-fermented beer that ranges in color from dark brown to almost black.

Marcus Baskerville, founder and head brewer at Weathered Souls, told the San Antonio Current: “The brewing industry is pretty eclectic, with all kinds of different people in it. Why wouldn’t this community be one to join together to support a message of equality and purpose to support the concept of general respect for everybody?”

Read more (San Antonio Current)

Craft breweries, which were heading into their second decade of a major boom, are now shuttering during the coronavirus pandemic. “There’s going to be a lot of dead distilleries coming out of this,” said Paul Hletko, the founder and distiller of FEW Spirits, in Evanston, Ill. “Even if you survive, the new normal is going to be punishing for small brands.” Craft distilling relies on bars, tasting rooms, face-to-face sales and customers willing to pay a higher price for a premium product — all factors dramatically changing with social distancing and a global recession.

Read more (The New York Times)

Fermented drinks are experiencing soaring sales during the coronavirus crisis. Sales are up for kombucha (10.1%), wine (27.6%), spirits (26.45%) and beer/cider (14%). (Nielsen Data)

Craft alcohol producers, who asked the government for assistance this month, may now obtain SBA loans interest free to help maintain payroll, mortgage, rent and utilities during the coronavirus outbreak. The CARES act was designed to incentivize small businesses to avoid layoffs. Craft breweries and cideries who were forced to close breweries, bars, wineries and taprooms this month during the coronavirus outbreak. The Emergency Disaster Loans will provide assistance up to $10,000. ..Both the Brewers Association (BA) and the American Cider Association praised the stimulus package, but noted it’s not perfect. 

“This this is a significant step forward that provides much needed relief for small and independent breweries who are facing dire economic challenges, there is more work to be done,” according to a statement by the BA.

Read more (Beverage Daily)

We asked three fermentation experts if recent popularity of fermented foods is a fading trend or a new food movement. These industry professionals weigh in on their predictions for fermentation’s future. The fermenters include: Bri Warner (CEO of Atlantic Sea Farms, a commercially viable seaweed farm that makes kelp kraut and kimchi), Nicholas Gregory (owner of Pulp Hot Sauce, an Atlanta-based fermented condiment brand), Joshua Rood (co-founder and CEO Dr Hops Kombucha beer, a health-conscious alcohol).

Do you think the surge of fermented food and drinks is a trend will disappear or a new food movement here to stay?

Bri Warner, CEO Atlantic Sea Farms: “Now that we have a robust understanding of how good gut health effects overall health, I think fermentation is here to stay. I do think the category will continue to innovate to remain relevant, with a stronger focus on quality ingredients that are good for people, planet, and, in our case, oceans!”

Nicholas Gregory, owner Pulp Hot Sauce: “I think the current fermented food movement is here to stay. We are at an intersection of technology, science and health further than we have ever seen in human history. The internet, television, several seminal books and air travel have given us unprecedented exposure and access to information. This exposure and access to food and world cultures is more in depth than ever before. Including the food history and traditions of those cultures. Combine that awareness with a relatively intelligent and sophisticated medical system; an understanding of healthy lifestyles, a willingness to make healthy decisions, an understanding of the benefits of a healthy gut biome and how it all correlates to a longer, happier, healthier life. Along with a craving for umami and fermented funky flavors for a growing number of the population. I believe we are in the middle of a movement that shows no signs of slowing down or going away anytime soon. In fact, I see it only becoming more popular, more normal, more accepted, more diverse, more creative and more exciting in the decades to come.”

Joshua Rood, co-founder and CEO Dr Hops Kombucha beer: “As co-founder and CEO of Dr Hops Kombucha Beer, I appreciate that there is currently a powerful trend towards living, fermented foods. But answering the question of whether or not that will continue is repugnant. We here at Dr Hops are driving that trend! We are not playing the game of hoping that it will simply continue. We are committing ourselves, each day, to the life-enhancing awesomeness of fresh, authentic, fermented foods and beverages. Please join us in that! Join us in leading the health-conscious food and beverage revolution!”