Future Trends in Yogurt

Yogurt’s evolution in America mirrors the country’s food culture. From the sugar-filled yogurt of the 80’s to the fruit-on-the-bottom cups of the 90’s to protein-heavy Greek yogurt of the 2000’s to artisanal styles (Icelandic, French, Australian) of the early 2010’s to the non-dairy varieties of the late 2010’s and to the current trend of low-carb, high-fat, keto-friendly yogurt. Americans used to scoff at tart-tasting yogurt — now it’s embraced and sugar-filled yogurt is shunned.

“With yogurt occupying more and more shelf space in grocery stores — and tracking so closely with American diet habits — companies are constantly trying to figure out what’s going to be big in yogurt,” reads the article. Experts are betting on yogurt made with cold-brew concentrate and protein-rich, dairy-free yogurt made with with synthetic proteins. 


Continues the article: “(Frank Palantoni, former vice president of marketing for Dannon) compares what has happened with American consumers and yogurt to what happened with wine. ‘Americans have a very limited receptivity of their palate to new flavors,’ he says. But once given options, with different tastes and textures, ‘you will eventually develop your palate and it will get more sophisticated.’ The variety in yogurt has made many people more adventurous eaters. As packed as the yogurt aisle seems, expect even more wide-ranging offerings in coming years. And that, he adds, is a good thing. 

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In an era where gluten is considered a dirty word, Vogue highlights three female bakers using traditional bread baking techniques, fermented ingredients and heritage recipes for a “modern baking renaissance.”

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Fermentation guru and chef Jeremy Umansky is opening a restaurant that takes a modern twist on an old-world, Jewish-style deli. Larder: A Curated Delicatessen & Bakery in Cleveland serves fermented favorites like sauerkraut, pickles, giardiniera, pickled smelt, pickled radishes and fermented cabbage leaves.

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Vegan cheese artisans are mastering the flavor of nut cheeses. The process requires a fermentation cycle of 8 hours to a couple days. The longer a nut cheese ferments, the better depth and “cheesy” odor. The flavor is added during fermentation, which at Dr. Cow cheese shop in Brooklyn includes nut cheese flavors like reishi mushroom spores, blue-green algae and saffron and truffles.

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Two Kansas City kombucha brewers discuss starting up local, handcrafted kombucha labels. Teabiotics and Lucky Elixir (made by The Brewkery) praise the gut health benefits, and say the kombucha industry will continue to grow in the next 10 years.

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New trend in wine production -ANS


A growing trend in the wine industry: fermenting in concrete tanks instead of oak barrels or stainless steel containers. Winemakers find concrete helps produce a wine that is bright and fruity, without the risk of introducing unwanted elements or a sterile taste. Ironically, though concrete tanks are growing in popularity now, Greek and Roman winemakers used to ferment wine in ceramic amphorae 2,000 years ago.

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Oregon Fruit Products added a new limited flavor to their lineup of Fruit for Fermentation purees. Tangerine joins aseptic fruit purees like boysenberry and grapefruit that fermenters can add to kitchen creations. Citrus flavors have become especially popular purees adds the co. sales director.

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Restaurants, food businesses, agricultural entrepreneurs: “be sure to recognize the food porn craze as your best friend, when it comes to growing your following and your business” advises Entrepreneur Mag. In your online marketing like social media apps and website, use well-lit food photography and include images of people enjoying your food.

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Increasing wine consumption makes China critical to the future of the industry, but trade disputes are hurting U.S. winemakers. China included wine on a list of potential tariffs. Exports represent 5% of US wine sales – 5% of that ($79 million worth) is sent to China.

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More consumers are buying kimchi. A market analysis of the Korean fermented vegetable dish found that, globally, kimchi sales will grow by 20-45% a year through 2022. Since 2012, the kimchi market has steadily grown in the U.S. and India.

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