The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at http://ow.ly/dfN030mfgBY .

René Redzepi and David Zilber’s new book, “The Noma Guide to Fermentation,” could have been a vegetarian cookbook, since vegetarianism is trending. That would have been easy. But Redzepi “was very adamant that fermentation is a field that’s going to keep growing, and a book like this is going to help push it forward.” Fermented ingredients now surpass foraged ingredients as “the most important elements” in the pantry at Noma, the fine-dining restaurant in Copenhagen that has been named the world’s best restaurant four times.

Read more (Washington Post)

Are brut IPAs a trend that will fade or a movement that will stick? Started in San Francisco, brut IPAs are a beer style that is dry, crisp and heavily carbonated like champagne. The unique flavor is thanks to the fermentation process, where an amyloglucosidase enzyme is used to “ferment sugars that wouldn’t break down with yeast alone, which leaves them totally dry,” according to the LA Times. Brewers and hopheads are excited about brut IPAs, leading to many breweries offering brut IPAs on their menu.

Read more (LA Times)

In an effort to attract more health-conscious diners, McDonald’s is removing artificial ingredients from its menu. Ironically, one item will remain the same: the pickle. Arguably the easiest item to remain naturally clean and fermented, McDonald’s will continue to use pickles with artificial preservatives. Their buns, cheese, sauce and patties will now no longer include artificial preservatives, flavors or coloring.

Read more (CNN Money) (Photo: McDonald’s)

Americans no longer want preservative-filled American cheese. Sales of Kraft Singles and Velveeta cheese are on their fourth year of declining sales. Consumers are looking for high-quality cheeses instead. The number of U.S. cheese factories increased 40 percent between 2000 and 2017, growth driven by small, specialty cheesemakers. Even popular U.S. chain restaurants are switching out American cheese for better flavors (like fontina and smoked gouda), new recipes that are resulting in higher sales.

Read more (Bloomberg) (Photo: Foodies Feed)

René Redzepi and David Zilber will speak across the U.S. on their book tour. Redzepi (chef and co-owner of Noma in Copenhagen, recognized as one of the world’s best restaurants) and Zilber (chef at Nima who runs the fermentation lab) will talk about their new book “The Noma Guide to Fermentation.” The book is also available for preorder on Amazon. Here’s a list of their full tour:

Sunday, October 14 – Toronto

7:00 p.m. at The Isabel Bader Theatre

Presented in partnership with Indigo Books & Music

Details and tickets here

 

Monday, October 15 – Seattle

6:30 p.m. at The SIFF Cinema Egyptian

Presented in partnership with Book Larder

Details and tickets here

 

Tuesday, October 16 – San Francisco

7:00 p.m. at JCCSF

Presented in partnership with Omnivore Books

Details and tickets here

 

Wednesday, October 17 – Los Angeles

8:00 p.m. at the Ann and Jerry Moss Theatre

Presented in partnership with Barnes & Noble

Details and tickets here

 

Friday, October 19 – Minneapolis

6:30 p.m. at the American Swedish Institute

Details and tickets here

 

Saturday, October 20 – Chicago

3:00 p.m. at Venue West

Presented in partnership with Read It and Eat

Details and tickets here

 

Monday, October 22 – New York

7:30 p.m. at the 92nd Street Y

Presented in partnership with Kitchen Arts & Letters

Details and tickets here

 

Tuesday, October 23 – Washington, DC

7:00 p.m. at Lisner Auditorium

Presented in partnership with Politics & Prose

Details and tickets here

 

Wednesday, October 24 – Philadelphia

7:30 p.m. at the Free Library of Philadelphia

Presented in partnership with Joseph Fox Bookshop

Details and tickets here

 

Meet David Zilber – Additional tour dates

Please note the following dates are with appearances by author David Zilber only:

 

Thursday, October 25 – Philadelphia

10:00 a.m. David Zilber in conversation with Jeff Gordinier, Esquire food editor, at Drexel University

Details and tickets here

 

Friday, October 26 – Boston

12:30 p.m. David Zilber in conversation with Dr. Pia Sorensen, Harvard University Lecturer on Science and Cooking, at

First Parish Church, Cambridge

Presented in partnership with Porter Square Books

Details and tickets here

 

Saturday, October 27 – Montréal

2:00 p.m David Zilber in conversation with chef Jonathan Cheung at Appetite for Books

Details and tickets here


“The world’s oldest alcoholic beverage has suddenly become new again,” the New York Times writes of mead. The fermented honey drink (also known as honey wine) is featured in a new book “Mead: The Libations, Legends and Lore of History’s Oldest Drink.” According to the American Mead Makers Association, mead is more popular than craft beer, with a new meadery opening in the U.S. every seven days.

Read more (The New York Times)

Snacks Fastest Growing Food Product

Snacks are one of the fastest growing food and beverage products, increasing 11.6% in sales for $5.4 billion in annual sales. Interesting ingredients are driving innovation, like probiotic-packed protein bars and turmeric-flavored chips. Fermented food products are becoming a snack regular on grocery store shelves, like OH SNAP pickled vegetables.

Read more (Supermarket News) (Photo: OH SNAP)

Spontaneous fermentation is seeing a big surge among breweries. It’s a method beer, cider, wine and liquor makers should consider because spontaneous fermentation is a sign that the brewer is confident in their technique, willing to trust the uncontrolled aspects of the fermentation process and having fun, says Bon Appetit magazine. Also known as hands-off, natural or traditional fermentation, it’s the oldest form of fermentation, used before fermentation could be controlled and regulated.

Read more (Bon Appetit) 

Food venture centers are proving a valuable resource for fermented food startups. The Cornell Food Venture Center is helping aspiring food entrepreneurs in the Northeast with business development, product safety and commercialization. New York-based Perfectly Pickled Products (P3) shares their experience going from an idea to an agribusiness with the food venture center. They sell pickled eggs, sausage, beans and, of course, pickles. Many customers are drawn to the nostalgia, remembering eating these fermented favorites at their grandparents table.

Read more (Cornell Chronicle)