Two scientists have a patent pending on a brewery invention that detects the wild yeast contaminant Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The wild yeast causes secondary fermentation in beer production, fermenting unfermentable sugars and overcarbonating brews. A contamination costs brewers millions in recalled product, lost sales and decreased market share. The patent is by a University of Sciences director and his 20-year-old undergrad researcher. The microbiological medium would be marketed for professional and home brewers.

Read more (Philadelphia Business Journal)

Peet’s Coffee is the second major coffee brand adding kombucha to their portfolio. The craft coffee company announced that it acquired major stake in Revive Kombucha. Revive grew 168% in the last year, and the latest financing will likely help Revive capture the national market. The kombucha will be sold in more than 15,000 of Peet’s grocery store locations. Eric Lauterbach, President of the Consumer Division at Peet’s Coffee, said kombucha is a natural fit since consumers tend to love both coffee and kombucha.

Read more (PR Newswire) (Photo: Revive Kombucha)

The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at http://ow.ly/dfN030mfgBY .

The latest special edition of TIME magazine featured a familiar cover star: beer. In “The Story of the World’s Most Celebrated Drink,” TIME attributes the drink’s popularity largely to a social factor. People like to drink beer in social settings – it has far less alcohol, it’s a staple at sporting events and people who frequent pubs have a wider social circle. And great news for local, craft brewers – today, beer drinkers prefer local breweries over bars. (TIME) https://goo.gl/ra98Bk

A kombucha entrepreneur made a major deal on the latest episode of “Shark Tank.” All the investor “sharks” wanted in on Kate Field’s at-home kombucha brewing kit. Two sharks offered Field $350,000 in exchange for 10 percent of her business, The Kombucha Shop. The kit sells for $45 and includes a reusable brew jar, a temperature gauge, test strips, brewing instructions and ingredients. (Inc.) (Photo from: The Kombucha Shop) https://goo.gl/4GjJhq .

Fermented food and drink is on top of food trend lists for 2019. Gourmet Insider Magazine and Food & Drink Resources ranked fermented foods high, citing a consumer focus on gut health and a desire for more unique flavors fermentation offers. Other fermented trends include CBD-infused cocktails and coffee drinks, and “loaded” cocktails that taste unique and are decorated with unique garnishes.

Read more (Gourmet Insider)

The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at http://ow.ly/dfN030mfgBY .

René Redzepi and David Zilber’s new book, “The Noma Guide to Fermentation,” could have been a vegetarian cookbook, since vegetarianism is trending. That would have been easy. But Redzepi “was very adamant that fermentation is a field that’s going to keep growing, and a book like this is going to help push it forward.” Fermented ingredients now surpass foraged ingredients as “the most important elements” in the pantry at Noma, the fine-dining restaurant in Copenhagen that has been named the world’s best restaurant four times.

Read more (Washington Post)

Are brut IPAs a trend that will fade or a movement that will stick? Started in San Francisco, brut IPAs are a beer style that is dry, crisp and heavily carbonated like champagne. The unique flavor is thanks to the fermentation process, where an amyloglucosidase enzyme is used to “ferment sugars that wouldn’t break down with yeast alone, which leaves them totally dry,” according to the LA Times. Brewers and hopheads are excited about brut IPAs, leading to many breweries offering brut IPAs on their menu.

Read more (LA Times)

In an effort to attract more health-conscious diners, McDonald’s is removing artificial ingredients from its menu. Ironically, one item will remain the same: the pickle. Arguably the easiest item to remain naturally clean and fermented, McDonald’s will continue to use pickles with artificial preservatives. Their buns, cheese, sauce and patties will now no longer include artificial preservatives, flavors or coloring.

Read more (CNN Money) (Photo: McDonald’s)