The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at fermentationassociation.org .

Fermentation is dominating 2019 food prediction lists. The New York Times says fermented foods and fermented drinks will rule in 2019. The year’s flavor profile will be “Sour and funky, with shades of heat,” melding fermented ingredients with millennial taste buds. Probiotics and prebiotics will continue to reign as consumers focus on gut health. “As the obsession with digestive health dovetails with the fascination for fermenting, kimchi, sauerkraut and pickled things will work their way into new territory. Smoothies with kefir will be popular, and kombucha will show up in unexpected places like salad dressings,” the article continues. What will you be eating in 2019?

Read more (New York Times)

After fermented milk Yakult was featured in the new romantic comedy “To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before,” stock in the company climbed 2.6 percent. Called a “Korean yogurt smoothie” in the movie, fans spotted the Japanese probiotic drink immediately. After the movie’s release, Yakult’s “mention frequency” spiked on social media. Prior to the product placement, Yakult’s stock shares were dropping 6 percent after slow sales growth.

Read more (Bloomberg)

America could be facing a pickle shortage. Since the mid-2000s, a mildew has been destroying cucumber crops. Fewer farmers are growing cucumbers now because of the high amount of failed harvests. USDA records show pickling cucumber acreage has declined 25 percent between 2004 and 2015. Lina Quesada-Ocampo, vegetable pathologist at North Carolina State University told NPR: “This is the number one threat to the pickle industry.” Thankfully, vegetable breeder Michael Mazourek, a professor at Cornell University, is developing a cucumber variety resistant to mildew.

Read more (NPR)

Two scientists have a patent pending on a brewery invention that detects the wild yeast contaminant Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The wild yeast causes secondary fermentation in beer production, fermenting unfermentable sugars and overcarbonating brews. A contamination costs brewers millions in recalled product, lost sales and decreased market share. The patent is by a University of Sciences director and his 20-year-old undergrad researcher. The microbiological medium would be marketed for professional and home brewers.

Read more (Philadelphia Business Journal)

Peet’s Coffee is the second major coffee brand adding kombucha to their portfolio. The craft coffee company announced that it acquired major stake in Revive Kombucha. Revive grew 168% in the last year, and the latest financing will likely help Revive capture the national market. The kombucha will be sold in more than 15,000 of Peet’s grocery store locations. Eric Lauterbach, President of the Consumer Division at Peet’s Coffee, said kombucha is a natural fit since consumers tend to love both coffee and kombucha.

Read more (PR Newswire) (Photo: Revive Kombucha)

The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at http://ow.ly/dfN030mfgBY .

The latest special edition of TIME magazine featured a familiar cover star: beer. In “The Story of the World’s Most Celebrated Drink,” TIME attributes the drink’s popularity largely to a social factor. People like to drink beer in social settings – it has far less alcohol, it’s a staple at sporting events and people who frequent pubs have a wider social circle. And great news for local, craft brewers – today, beer drinkers prefer local breweries over bars. (TIME) https://goo.gl/ra98Bk

A kombucha entrepreneur made a major deal on the latest episode of “Shark Tank.” All the investor “sharks” wanted in on Kate Field’s at-home kombucha brewing kit. Two sharks offered Field $350,000 in exchange for 10 percent of her business, The Kombucha Shop. The kit sells for $45 and includes a reusable brew jar, a temperature gauge, test strips, brewing instructions and ingredients. (Inc.) (Photo from: The Kombucha Shop) https://goo.gl/4GjJhq .

Fermented food and drink is on top of food trend lists for 2019. Gourmet Insider Magazine and Food & Drink Resources ranked fermented foods high, citing a consumer focus on gut health and a desire for more unique flavors fermentation offers. Other fermented trends include CBD-infused cocktails and coffee drinks, and “loaded” cocktails that taste unique and are decorated with unique garnishes.

Read more (Gourmet Insider)