The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at http://ow.ly/dfN030mfgBY .

“Use By” Dates Becoming Uniform

“Use By” dates are becoming uniform, with nine in 10 grocery store products now printing consumer-friendly labels. By 2020, all products will carry the more simplified date. The industrywide initiative aims to stop confusion over product expiration dates by standardizing wording on all products. The 10 date-label categories are now paired down to two – “Best If Used By” or “Use By.” Surveys found “when in doubt, throw it out” causes massive food waste in America, partly because of unclear food labeling. Over 90 percent of Americans throw out food because of a misunderstood label. Americans waste 133 billion pounds of food a year, a third of the U.S. food supply.

Read more (Supermarket News)

Fermented foods are the No. 1 superfood of 2018, according to a poll of U.S. dietitians. “The rising popularity of fermented foods demonstrates how consumers have expanded their definition of wellness to include improved gut health, which is a benefit of consuming fermented foods,” according to Food Business News. The article highlighted numerous chefs experimenting with fermented ingredients, and fermented food producers who share the health benefits of eating fermented products. These food industry experts point out that consumers today are looking for a twist on classic dishes, and fermented foods add bold flavors. Like pairing pickled veggies with tacos, adding fermented Brussels sprouts on a tapas plate and brining French fries in a salt and cabbage solution.

Read more (Food Business News) (Photo: Cultured Love)

A kombucha entrepreneur made a major deal on the latest episode of “Shark Tank.” All the investor “sharks” wanted in on Kate Field’s at-home kombucha brewing kit. Two sharks offered Field $350,000 in exchange for 10 percent of her business, The Kombucha Shop. The kit sells for $45 and includes a reusable brew jar, a temperature gauge, test strips, brewing instructions and ingredients. (Inc.) (Photo from: The Kombucha Shop) https://goo.gl/4GjJhq .

René Redzepi and David Zilber’s new book, “The Noma Guide to Fermentation,” could have been a vegetarian cookbook, since vegetarianism is trending. That would have been easy. But Redzepi “was very adamant that fermentation is a field that’s going to keep growing, and a book like this is going to help push it forward.” Fermented ingredients now surpass foraged ingredients as “the most important elements” in the pantry at Noma, the fine-dining restaurant in Copenhagen that has been named the world’s best restaurant four times.

Read more (Washington Post)

It’s National Pickle Day — Forbes explains why pickles are not a fading trend, but a growing food culture with staying power. The pickle market is growing, reaching a value of $12.74 billion by 2020 (half of that – $6.70 billion – is just in the U.S.). Pickles curb dehydration, are packed with antioxidants like vitamin C and E and the fermented vinegar in the juice is good for your gut. Today, pickle concoctions can be found on most aisles of a grocery store, from sports drinks to popcorn to popsicles.

Read more (Forbes)

In an effort to attract more health-conscious diners, McDonald’s is removing artificial ingredients from its menu. Ironically, one item will remain the same: the pickle. Arguably the easiest item to remain naturally clean and fermented, McDonald’s will continue to use pickles with artificial preservatives. Their buns, cheese, sauce and patties will now no longer include artificial preservatives, flavors or coloring.

Read more (CNN Money) (Photo: McDonald’s)

Fermented milk from yogurt to kefir to buttermilk is spiking in popularity. It’s estimated to grow 3.7% CAGR from 2017 to 2023, thanks to its long shelf-life, easy digestion and antioxidants.

The Fermentation Association (TFA), getting more people to enjoy fermented products. Join us at The Fermentation Association.

Americans no longer want preservative-filled American cheese. Sales of Kraft Singles and Velveeta cheese are on their fourth year of declining sales. Consumers are looking for high-quality cheeses instead. The number of U.S. cheese factories increased 40 percent between 2000 and 2017, growth driven by small, specialty cheesemakers. Even popular U.S. chain restaurants are switching out American cheese for better flavors (like fontina and smoked gouda), new recipes that are resulting in higher sales.

Read more (Bloomberg) (Photo: Foodies Feed)